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Announcements ~ 15 December 2019

fleur cross logo Tuesday Dec. 17 is our Parish Advent Penance Service at 6:30pm! Plan to join us with many priests present to celebrate the sacrament of reconciliation in English and Spanish.Tuesday Dec. 17 is our Parish Advent Penance Service at 6:30pm! Plan to join us with many priests present to celebrate the sacrament of reconciliation in English and Spanish.


fleur cross logo Please make sure your gifts from the Giving Tree are back in by tomorrow, Dec. 16 so that we can ensure their delivery in time for Christmas.  As always, we thank you for your kind and generous participation

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fleur cross logo The annual Christmas Collection for Catholic Charities was last week: if you did not get a chance to make a contribution last week, please drop it in any collection clearly marked Catholic Charities.


fleur cross logo ALL are invited to join us for our school's annual Christmas Pageant.  All students in preK to 8th grade will participate in carols and the Nativity story presented by the third grade.  Thursday, Dec. 19 at 6:30pm in the Church.

Fr. Don's Weekly Letter ~ 15 December 2019

Dear Good People of Saint Bernadette,Dear Good People of Saint Bernadette,


Tuesday this week is our Parish Advent Penance Service and, as last year, I have two important requests for you.


1. If you are still planning to come to confession before Christmas, please take advantage of this opportunity. There will not be a guarantee that we can cover demand later, or at the last minute. It is a great blessing to have so many priests (14!) give up an evening for our parish, and we will accomplish more in one evening than Fr. Rich and I alone could do in over a week. But you must come Tuesday night, 6:30pm.


2. This one is just as important. Come prepared, and do not plan on a counseling session or spiritual direction. Already have done the work of examining your conscience, know your sins, say them, receive a penance and absolution. Our goal here is simple:  serve as many people as is humanly possible as efficiently as possible. One of the reasons people give up on confessions is that they get stuck behind someone (or maybe several people) who take up so much time that there is no more time. I used to be a lay person, remember?  And I remember this one clearly. If you wish to have a longer conversation, plan on another day, or make an appointment with one of us, please.


I am not proposing an irreverent practice of the sacrament, but have done this before. If people know they aren’t going to get a lecture, you’d be surprised how many come back after many, many years. People already know the lecture they should get, that is why they come to confession!  I believe in treating everyone like an adult. As of that evening we will have offered confession already to every student in the school as well as our Religious Education program.


It was not always so:  when I was first ordained I liked confessions because it was an opportunity for me to cast my pearls of wisdom on poor penitents, solicited or not. I made it a point in every confession to admonish, to inspire and to affirm. Eventually I realized that most people don’t actually care.  There is something to be said for the simple acknowledgement that I have sinned, that I can’t fix this without God, and I need certain forgiveness. As I always tell the kids, if you truly forget something, it is okay, because Jesus already knows all of it, even the ones we are indifferent to. The one thing he can’t do for us is say “I’m sorry and I intend to do better from here on.”  Let’s keep it simple and welcome hundreds of people back to the sacrament of Reconciliation on Tuesday.


You will find a valuable resource for examinations of conscience on the USCCB website:  usccb.org/prayer-and-worship/sacraments-and-sacramentals/penance/examinations-of-conscience.cfm

 as well as a guides to confession:  http://usccb.org/prayer-and-worship/sacraments-and-sacramentals/penance/index.cfm. There you will find links to many resources in both English and Spanish.

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Reflection

The apostle Paul reflected in his letter to the Romans how Christ’s coming fulfilled the hopes of patriarchs and prophets and brought joy to his people:

For I tell you that Christ has become a servant of the Jews on behalf of God’s truth, so that the promises made to the patriarchs might be confirmed and, moreover, that the Gentiles might glorify God for his mercy. As it is written: 

    “Therefore I will praise you among the Gentiles;
      I will sing the praises of your name.” 
Again, it says,  
    “Rejoice, you Gentiles, with his people.”
And again,   
    “Praise the Lord, all you Gentiles;
     let all the peoples extol him.”
And again, Isaiah says,   
    “The Root of Jesse will spring up,
     one who will arise to rule over the nations;
     in him the Gentiles will hope.”

 

May the God of hope fill you with all joy and peace as you trust in him, so that you may overflow with hope by the power of the Holy Spirit. (Romans 15: 8-13)

Rejoice in the Lord! The pain, the suffering, the unfulfilled longings will no longer define us. We have a Savior.  He is coming. Rejoice!

On that day it shall be said to Jerusalem: Do not fear, O Zion; do not let your hands grow weak. The LORD, your God, is in your midst, a warrior who gives victory; he will rejoice over you with gladness, he will renew you in his love; he will exult over you with loud singing (Zephaniah 3:16-17).

The earth will be filled with the knowledge of the glory of the Lord as the waters cover the sea (Habakkuk 2:14).

God bless you,

Announcements ~ 8 December 2019

Christmas GIVING TREE continues this weekend in the Church Vestibule! Our annual tradition of taking tags and returning gifts will benefit Catholic Charities, Christ House, ECHO, Project Gabriel/Project Rachel, ServiceSource, Saint Ann’s Center for Children, Bethany House and Refugee Resettlement!  Gifts must be returned to the vestibule by noon on Monday, Dec. 16.Christmas GIVING TREE continues this weekend in the Church Vestibule! Our annual tradition of taking tags and returning gifts will benefit Catholic Charities, Christ House, ECHO, Project Gabriel/Project Rachel, ServiceSource, Saint Ann’s Center for Children, Bethany House and Refugee Resettlement!  Gifts must be returned to the vestibule by noon on Monday, Dec. 16.


This weekend is the Catholic Charities Annual Christmas Collection for the poor among us.  Please help this most important collection which provides 10% of the annual budget for Catholic Charities.  If you were unable to participate this week, please consider bringing your contribution next week, clearly marked for Catholic Charities.


In addition to the beautiful Solemnity of the Immaculate Conception, we will celebrate a bilingual Mass honoring Our Lady of Guadalupe on Thursday, Dec. 12 at 7:30pm.  The Mass will be preceded by a procession around 6pm, and followed by a reception.

Fr. Don's Weekly Letter ~ 8 December 2019

Dear Good People of Saint Bernadette,Dear Good People of Saint Bernadette,


Last Sunday several people expressed to me how Advent is their favorite season of the liturgical year.  I have to say yes, I agree.  There is something simple and meditative about it, unconfused and quiet.  It happens interiorly, doesn't it?  While the world is frantic outside.  We hold onto it as long as we can.  I had a rare, quiet moment in our church the other day thinking about decorating for Christmas—how great it is when all the decorations go up—and also how great it is when they all go away, too.  I used that “afterward” simplicity as a meditation on how much we should enjoy the present moment, a simple wreath, a single candle. While the world is frantic outside, shopping, honking, distracted by what's popular today.


In fact, in that moment, I found our church to be a perfect space for such a quiet season.  I guess at heart I am more like Abbot Bernard of Clairvaux than Abbot Suger of Saint Denis in Paris.  It is one of my favorite debates in history.  Saint Bernard, author of the Cistercian Benedictine reform, had a public debate with Abbot Suger and the Cluniac reform.  Paris was, as she is today, the place where the latest fads take place.  In the early 12th century the roots of humanism and the later Renaissance already were starting to grow.  Architecture was changing from the beautiful, classic simplicity of the Romanesque and literally going haywire with the Gothic. (I get a kick out of all the “traditionalists” who have revived the Gothic style for the last 150 years thinking it is the traditional form of church architecture—in the early 12th century it was over-the-top crazy modernism.)  And Saint Bernard didn’t like it.


Saint Bernard held that the invisible is to be preferred to the visible, that what we didn’t need was an architecture that would exalt man and call it praising God.  The Cistercians built with light, the way it fell on a simple unadorned stone wall from particularly ordered windows.  The space was constantly, differently defined in infinite expressions by the way the sun travels its path from east to west in shortening and lengthening days.  The purity and the integrity of the space was God present.  For Saint Bernard, decoration was nothing more than distraction, it was the catalyst for a lack of focus.  He even strictly limited the amount and kind of art which could be used.


You might call it visual asceticism if you are coming from a place where there are a lot of things to see.  But I think the light and the space is the starting point and people decorate who are not satisfied or even aware of the beauty that they possess.  It is a part of human history, sadly, that we always will be unsatisfied and want more, when we literally have all we need already.  The simplicity is already so filled with the real that there is no space for decoration.  From this perspective decoration seems like vanity.
I once had a friend who would ask people with crazy hair, “Are you wearing that hair or is that hair wearing you?”


Well, I found in our church a Cistercian simplicity.  Our architect, Mike Lemay, is a very serious, intentional architect and once explained to me that the simplicity of a contemplative space can have only one point of natural light, that directly over the altar, for a reason:  Any other lights would distract us and draw our attention away from the altar, which is the center of every worship space.  We become people of one mind, one heart, drawn together in that light.  Bricks and mortar are defined by us, not we by the aesthetic.


Part of me still wishes we had more windows, more of a relationship with what is on the outside of the church.  Maybe I still have some work to do this Advent, simplifying, preparing for the light to come and to simply find joy in its Presence.


God bless you.

 

Announcements ~ 1 December 2019

fleur cross logo Christmas GIVING TREE begins this weekend in the Church Vestibule! Our annual tradition of taking tags and returning gifts will benefit Catholic Charities, Christ House, ECHO, Project Gabriel/Project Rachel, ServiceSource, Saint Ann’s Center for Children, Bethany House and Refugee Resettlement!  Gifts must be returned to the vestibule by noon on Monday, Dec. 16.Christmas GIVING TREE begins this weekend in the Church Vestibule! Our annual tradition of taking tags and returning gifts will benefit Catholic Charities, Christ House, ECHO, Project Gabriel/Project Rachel, ServiceSource, Saint Ann’s Center for Children, Bethany House and Refugee Resettlement!  Gifts must be returned to the vestibule by noon on Monday, Dec. 16.


fleur cross logo There will be only one Special Mass at 10am on Thanksgiving, Thursday, November 28. Again this year, we ask all you attending to bring non-perishable food items to Mass, to be donated to the St. Lucy Project for those in need. We hope you will join us and begin your day with prayer and thanksgiving. Please note, there will be no 9am Mass.


fleur cross logo The Knights of Columbus begin their Keep Christ in Christmas Cards sales after all Masses this weekend in the vesibule of the church. Join us in keeping Christ in Christmas.

 

Upcoming Events

  • December 9, Monday: Solemnity of the Immaculate Conception of Mary (moved from December 8, this year is not a Holy Day of Obligation). Masses at 6:30 and 9am, Noon, 7:30pm.

  • December 12, Thursday: 7:30pm bilingual Mass honoring Our Lady of Guadalupe, Patroness of the Americas and the unborn.

  • December 13, Friday: Advent Lessons and Carols, 7:30pm

  • December 17, Tuesday: Parish Advent Penance Service, with many visiting priests! Begins at 6:30pm.

  • December 21, Saturday: Diocesan Simbang Gabi Mass and Reception at Saint Bernadette, 7pm.

Fr. Don's Weekly Letter ~ 1 December 2019

Dear Good People of Saint Bernadette,Dear Good People of Saint Bernadette,


Before starting this column, I wanted to tell you that we need about 10 more people for our trip to the Holy Land February 10-23.  I thought we were filling up - if you are interested, please call me. 

 

This week we have a message from Pope Francis at the start of Advent 2018, and then a letter from Bishop Burbidge.  First, Pope Francis:


“I invite all Christians, everywhere, at this very moment, to a renewed personal encounter with Jesus Christ, or at least an openness to letting him encounter them; I ask all of you to do this unfailingly each day. No one should think that this invitation is not meant for him or her, since ‘no one is excluded from the joy brought by the Lord (Pope Paul VI, Apostolic Exhortation Gaudete in Domino, 9 May 1975).’”


“Thanks solely to this encounter – or renewed encounter – with God’s love, which blossoms into an enriching friendship, we are liberated from our narrowness and self-absorption. We become fully human when we become more than human, when we let God bring us beyond ourselves in order to attain the fullest truth of our being. Here we find the source and inspiration of all our efforts at evangelization. For if we have received the love which restores meaning to our lives, how can we fail to share that love with others?”


Now, from Bishop Burbidge about a new diocesan spiritual campaign for Advent called #JustOneYes:

Bulletin Resource 2


Dear brothers and sisters in Christ, 


Mary of Nazareth changed the world forever when she offered her simple “yes” to the angel Gabriel and agreed to give birth to the Son of God, Jesus Christ. Because of her “yes,” God entered our world, died for our sins, and opened wide the gates of heaven. In humble acknowledgment of the power of just one “yes,” for the Advent and Christmas seasons, we are launching the Just One Yes campaign to encourage everyone in the Diocese to increase their connection to God through prayer, service of others, and self-sacrifice. Through the power of the Holy Spirit, your one yes will transform the world by turning darkness to light, division to unity, and chaos to peace.  

There are so many ways to “just say yes” to God. Each time you pray an Act of Contrition, a Rosary, or your favorite prayer, you chose Just One Yes that brings you closer to God. Each time you teach a child or a friend about Christ and His Church, you have said “yes” to God.

Whenever you spend time with the Lord before the Blessed Sacrament, you have said “yes.” The same can be said each time you donate food to the poor, bring clothing to the homeless, or offer up a personal suffering. Thinking about and then choosing just one yes draws you deeper into the heart of Christ who rejoices in our company.  

Each action, each “yes” to God, no matter how small, is a profound sign of devotion and humble acknowledgment of how much we need Our Lord to be in our lives. Once you say “yes” to God once, you will want to say “yes” many times over. Let us join together and commit to prayer, service and self-sacrifice during the Advent and Christmas seasons this year.  

Go to ArlingtonDiocese.org/JustOneYes to participate. 

Make this Advent and Christmas different than previous years. Commit to Just One Yes. It will change you, your family, your community, and, like Mary’s powerful “yes” to God, it can change the world. May Our Lord continue to bless you and your family, now and always.


Sincerely in Christ,


Bishop Michael F. Burbidge

Announcements ~ 24 November 2019

fleur cross logo Christmas GIVING TREE begins this weekend in the Church Vestibule! Our annual tradition of taking tags and returning gifts will benefit Catholic Charities, Christ House, ECHO, Project Gabriel/Project Rachel, ServiceSource, Saint Ann’s Center for Children, Bethany House and Refugee Resettlement!  Gifts must be returned to the vestibule by noon on Monday, Dec. 16.
 
fleur cross logo There will be only one Special Mass at 10am on Thanksgiving, Thursday, November 28. Again this year, we ask all you attending to bring non-perishable food items to Mass, to be donated to the St. Lucy Project for those in need. We hope you will join us and begin your day with prayer and thanksgiving. Please note, there will be no 9am Mass.
 
fleur cross logo The Knights of Columbus begin their Keep Christ in Christmas Cards sales after all Masses this weekend in the vesibule of the church. Join us in keeping Christ in Christmas.
 

Upcoming Events

December 9, Monday: Solemnity of the Immaculate Conception of Mary (moved from December 8, this year is not a Holy Day of Obligation). Masses at 6:30 and 9am, Noon, 7:30pm.

December 12, Thursday: 7:30pm bilingual Mass honoring Our Lady of Guadalupe, Patroness of the Americas and the unborn.

December 13, Friday, Advent Lessons and Carols, 7:30pmDecember 17, Tuesday: Parish Advent Penance Service, with many visiting priests! Begins at 6:30pm.

December 21, Saturday: Diocesan Simbang Gabi Mass and Reception at Saint Bernadette, 7pm.

 

Fr. Don's Weekly Letter ~ 24 November 2019

Dear Good People of Saint Bernadette,

Next week we begin the Year of Grace 2020 with the first Sunday of the Advent Season. I thought I might talk about the season now before it starts, because it is easy to forget about it with so many other things going on. Everyone is making preparations for Christmas, shopping for gifts to give, many filled with good will giving generously to the poor, and celebrating the beauty of Christmas. Of course, these are good things and truly matter in our observance of so great a feast as the Nativity of Jesus. But the greatest preparation, that of our hearts to receive such a great Gift, often is put off or consumed by so many distractions.

For me Advent is a time of stillness, even refuge from all the craziness of the material preparations. Something supernatural is going on. Can you feel it?

If you don't find a moment of quiet and pay attention to God, it won't happen. There has to be silence, and the time to think for a moment of the profound reality of what is coming so soon.

The Son of God, all-powerful and all-everything, is about to cloak his perfect divinity in our perfect humanity becoming visible in our most loveable form, a baby, completely dependent on us to care for him. He is the fulfillment of generations of longing, waiting for the promise of God to be fulfilled. He is the spark that ignites the darkness of our lonely waiting with an unearthly light, the light that opens our minds and our hearts to him and to each other. This is something that God makes possible, but we must participate in it in order for his Glory to shine in us. His Incarnation took place so that, by our choosing to live in him, his divinity can live incarnately, literally, in us as well.

For this, we have Advent. Less than five short weeks long, it is a time of spiritual preparation.

Sometime in the fourth century, the Church realized that there were just too many people to be baptized at the Easter Vigil, and it seemed too long to make people wait an extra year if a person was not prepared sufficiently. As Lent was originally the time for non-Christians to prepare for Baptism (the catechumenate), a second similar structure came into practice to prepare for baptisms at Christmas. Over time, after people had been received into the Church sacramentally at Easter, they then began to use the season of Lent as a time of penance: prayer, fasting and almsgiving. We ask God to restore us to the baptismal innocence of sinlessness. Lent became a season of penance.

In the Middle Ages, preparation for the coming of Jesus shifted focus not only on his Nativity, but also on his second coming. For some centuries, then, Advent also became a time of prayer and fasting to prepare for the day of judgment. It began on Nov. 11 on the Feast of Saint Martin and lasted until Christmas. Some religious orders in our Latin-rite Church still observe this "Saint Martin's Lent." Even today, the Orthodox churches observe a season similar to Lent beginning on Nov. 15.

There aren't a lot of traditions related to Advent, maybe because it seems to be defined not in itself, but by events and themes that surround it. I find that waiting with your lamps lit is one of the primary seasonal themes, like the ten wise and foolish virgins who wait with their lamps lit for the coming of the bridegroom. He came quite a bit later than expected and some of the girls ran out of gas. When he comes we want to enter and feast with him. Rather than our lamps growing dim and going out, we want to see our light grow brighter in the season. This is one of the underlying themes of the Advent wreath. It is a representation of our progress in preparing our hearts for his coming. We are brightened by his presence; the nearer he comes, the brighter we become.

The Advent wreath is a folk tradition of northern Europe—not Christian, but one which was adopted by Christianity during the Renaissance (sixteenth century). Lighted during the longest days of the year, many candles were placed in winter evergreens arranged in a circular fashion that spoke of the cycle of time and season and ongoing life. Four candles became the Christianized custom, one for each of the Sundays in Advent. Purple was the most expensive of dyes and therefore spoke royalty: The King is coming. And rose is the color of joy, a joy we find not so much in waiting and more waiting, but in the excitement of anticipation for what is to be.

In the silence of this time, maybe just sit quietly and imagine what Love must be, that this story unfolds for us in our lives. Replace ideas of impatience with anticipation. Anticipation is excitement, isn't it? Waiting eagerly for something you know is going to happen. Anticipation is faith, hope and love, all in one.

God bless you.

Announcements ~ 17 November 2019

fleur cross logo World’s Finest Chocolates! Our School Chocolate Sale will run October 25–November 17 after all weekend Masses. The school receives 50% of the funds raised. Thank you for supporting our school!World’s Finest Chocolates! Our School Chocolate Sale will run October 25–November 17 after all weekend Masses. The school receives 50% of the funds raised. Thank you for supporting our school!


fleur cross logo Christmas GIVING TREE begins November 23rd in the Church Vestibule! Our annual tradition of taking tags and returning gifts will benefit Catholic Charities, Christ House, ECHO, Project Gabriel/Project Rachel, ServiceSource, Saint Ann’s Center for Children, Bethany House and Refugee Resettlement!


fleur cross logo Beautiful handcrafted Olive Wood religious goods from Bethlehem will be for sale after all Masses November 16-17. A perfect gift from Bethlehem will complete your shopping list for Christmas and help support our brothers and sisters surviving in the Holy Land!  


fleur cross logo Our School will host an Open House on Friday, November 22 from 9-11am. Please plan to join us and learn more about how Catholic Education can make a difference in the life of your child.


fleur cross logo There will be only one Special Mass at 10am on Thanksgiving, Thursday, November 28. Again this year, we ask all you attending to bring non-perishable food items to Mass, to be donated to the St. Lucy Project for those in need. We hope you will join us and begin your day with prayer and thanksgiving. Please note, there will be no 9am Mass.


fleur cross logo 2019 Saint Bernadette Parish Calendars - Please pick up a beautiful parish calendar which can be found on display in the church vestibule (one per family)


fleur cross logo The Knights of Columbus will begin their Keep Christ in Christmas Cards sales after all Masses next weekend in the vesibule of the church. Join us in keeping Christ in Christmas.

 

 

Fr. Don's Weekly Letter ~ 17 November 2019

Dear Good People of Saint Bernadette,Dear Good People of Saint Bernadette,


We are coming again to the end of the liturgical year, a time which corresponds to the end of the ages of this earth and the judgment on the last day.  It is a time to think about what really matters.  All this is passing; this is not the end, this is not the goal, the answers we seek lie beyond this.


A lot of people have expressed their dissatisfaction about how things may or may not be turning out with their lives, and this is the time we remember that this is not supposed to be satisfying...  if it were we would sell ourselves short and not long for heaven.  If only the shortcomings of time could be more obvious of our desire for fulfillment in eternity with God.


I was looking for the right words, and then came across Pope Francis' Angelus homily from last Sunday.  Let's read his words together as reported by Vatican News:


"We are called to prepare for Eternal life with our choices.


"Before the recitation of the Marian prayer, Pope Francis focuses his attention on Sunday’s Gospel reading in which Jesus is provoked by a question by the Sadducees and in turn offers a wonderful teaching on the resurrection of the dead.


"The Pope remarked that the Lord does not fall into the trap set by the Sadducees who ask him when a woman dies who has been married to seven brothers, one after the another, whose wife will she be?


"Jesus’ teaches on the resurrection
Pope Francis described how Jesus replies by saying, 'the risen in the beyond take neither wife nor husband, for they can no longer die, because they are equal to the angels and, since they are children of the resurrection, they are children of God.'


"With this answer, noted the Pope 'Jesus first of all invites his interlocutors—and us, too—to think that this earthly dimension in which we live now is not the only one, but there is another, no longer subject to death, in which it will be fully manifested that we are children of God.'  This response commented Pope Francis gives 'great consolation and hope to listen to this simple and clear word of Jesus about life beyond death; we need it so much especially in our time, so rich in knowledge about the universe but so poor in wisdom about eternal life.'


"This clear certainty of Jesus about the Resurrection, said the Pope, 'is based entirely on the fidelity of God, who is the God of life.'


" Life belongs to God
Jesus answers that life belongs to God, underlined the Pope, 'who loves us and cares so much about us, to the point of tying his name to ours: he is "the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac and the God of Jacob.”'God is not of the dead, but of the living; for all live for him,' said Pope Francis.  He added, that 'there is no life where one has the pretension to belong only to oneself and to live as islands: in these attitudes death prevails.'


" Eternal life is our destiny
In fact, he stressed, 'the resurrection is not only the fact of resurrecting after death, but it is a new kind of life that we can already experience now. Eternal life is our destiny, the horizon of definitive fullness of our history. And it is in this life that we are called to prepare through evangelical choices.'"


That is, choices based on the Gospel truth which we have received, and not our own voices in our heads.  So many in the world, today, believe as did the Sadducees of Jesus' time, that somehow death is the end.  The vast majority of our world does not bother with thoughts about what is to come.  I have found that, when the topic comes up outside of faith circles, the concept is met with suspicion and doubt.  As a child one of the fundamental realities that shaped my self-understanding and my understanding of God's creative love was the fact that he made us more than his other creations with a soul, a spirit that is somehow like God and makes us compatible.  (He makes this completely obvious when the Son of God becomes one of us and reveals the absolute compatibility of what is divine and human.  And that his love made us such that we have a chance to be with him forever.  A stunning claim, but not one that we invented: he himself revealed this to us.


If anything, our disappointments and frustrations with this life should drive us back to the God who promises something else, rather than reject him who had nothing to do with turning his masterpiece into a mess.  


I said in a daily Mass this week, I believe that the crisis today is not a crisis of faith ("I'm losing my faith...") but rather a crisis of free will.  For whatever reason, I have evolved with a new autonomy in which I choose no longer to believe, despite 2,000 years of witness and spirituality.  Faith, hope and love are all that remain, says Saint Paul.  But we can decide they are no longer of value to us in the traps we have made.


When we encounter people who no longer believe, it is our faith, our hope, our love, that will light their way.


God bless you.

 
Christmas Bake Sale
Saint Bernadette's
First Annual
Christmas Bake Sale
December 14 and 15
after all Masses
(click image to participate)
 
 
advent starry night 4 928x356
 
Christmas Advent Schedule 2019
 
 
 
 
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Our Saint Bernadette 2019'-2020 Ministry Catalog

 

2019 2020 Catalog