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Mass and Weekly Announcements for the week of 5 April 2020

Easter Triduum Liturgies

To view the live streaming of the liturgies of the Easter Triduum (Holy Thursday at 7:30pm, Good Friday at 3:00pm and Holy Saturday - Easter Vigil at 8:30pm) go to our FaceBook page. These beautiful liturgies will be live and archived to be viewed after the conclusion of the Liturgy - NO FACE BOOK ACCOUNT NEEDED,  if you receive a popup at the bottom of the page, please click "Not Now" 

Mass of the Lord's Supper 

Holy Thursday Mass of the Last Supper Liturgy Booklet


Good Friday Passion Liturgy Booklet (3pm)

 

OFFICE OF READINGS AND MORNING PRAYER

Office of Readings and Morning Prayer for Good Friday (8:15am)

Liturgy of the Hours Booklet

Join with Fr. Don and Fr. Rich and members of our  parish Lector Ministry and staff and in praying the Office of Readings and Morning Prayer from the Liturgy of the Hours for the Paschal Triduum. Pray with us using the booklet: Thursday starts on page 1, Friday on page 12 and Saturday on page 25. We have followed the Holy Week tradition of joining each day's Office of Readings and Morning Prayer together by omitting the Concluding Prayer of the Office of Readings and continuing with Antiphon 1 of Morning Prayer.

NO FACEBOOK ACCOUNT NEEDED TO VIEW DAILY AND SUNDAY MASSES, Just click on "Not Now"


ANNOUNCEMENTS

fleur cross logo Washington Lamb is partnering with organizations to get fresh meat, poultry and other essentials in family quantities at wholesale prices out to communities. This coming Thursday, Saint Bernadette Church and Friday, Prince of Peace Lutheran Church in Springfield, VA will be hosting pick-up events from 10am - 2pm. Below are the fliers for both partnering churches and a list of products being offered and pricing. Orders are placed, prepaid, and distributed utlizing no contact service, greatly reducing spread and contraction factors compared to traditional brick and mortar grocers. Prices are lower and the supply is guaranteed at the time of order. 

Saint Bernadette Church - Thursday, April 9, 10am - 2pm 

Prince of Peace Lutheran Church - Friday, April 10, 10am - 2pm

Community Drop Pricing


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Following guidelines provided by Bishop Burbidge, there will be no distribution of palms this year.

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Times are uncertain but we rely on your offering to the weekly collection to continue parish ministries.  We humbly ask your continued financial support.

fleur cross logo With the closure of Fairfax County Government Offices, our parish office is not physically open, but Kendra and Ivonne are standing by to receive your calls forwarded to them at home.  Fr. Don is still in the office and between the three of them we can probably respond to your needs or connect you with the rest of our parish staff who are still working from home.  We are still here for you.

fleur cross logo The Bishop’s Lenten Appeal is underway  and we are asking every household in our parish to support this appeal to the extent you are able.   BLA funds are restricted gifts that provide many programs, services and ministries that serve people in need, and may not be used for any other purpose. 

fleur cross logo Mass Intentions are still available and beginning next week we have Masses scheduleed without intentions.  We have a form which may be found on the Announcements page of the website for you to make requests for Mass intentions.  Or, just call the office.  We are still answering the phone!

                                                                               LET US HOLD EACH OTHER CLOSE IN PRAYER

Fr. Don's Weekly Letter ~ 5 April 2020

Dear Good People of Saint Bernadette,

With stunning speed the liturgy today begins with a triumphal entry of Jesus into Jerusalem to the acclaim of the crowd, changing into rejection and a death sentence by the crowd and crucifixion by the end of the week.  Jesus’ freely chosen collision course with the world plunged him and his followers into a darkness we scarcely could imagine.  Jesus’ church who follows in his example, has repeated the story over the many centuries in the lives of her martyrs and heroes who continued to seek her mission without regard to themselves, despite the suffering and death they shared with Jesus.  Just as Jesus knew he would not have died but freely gave himself up to death for us and for our salvation, he gives hope to those whose love allows them to give themselves to God with the full knowledge that, in him, the fullness of life comes after our time on this earth is over. 

The underlying love overcomes the fear.

Jesus knows the truth of death and helps us have a proper understanding of death.  Look to him.  The immensity of his love which had its beginning in the very life of the everlasting, always active love of the Trinity.  Our life is without end, as is God's.

I did my M.A. thesis in Systematic Theology on the kenosis, or self-emptying love of God.  The self-emptying love of Jesus on the Cross was the culmination of what had begun before time itself.  The Book of Revelation in chapters five and 13 speaks of a Lamb on the throne, slain before the foundation of the world, in whose hands are held the names of all the living.  The Lamb who is slain lives, giving his life.  The Lamb is, himself, the Beloved of the Father. The Father empties himself so completely in his begetting that a perfect likeness is revealed, so completely the same that the only difference between the two is that one Person is begetting, one Person is being begotten.  One is not before the other:  the process is the constant, eternal identity of God.  Jesus introduces the names Father and Son.  The perfect self-emptying love of the Father in begetting the Son and the perfect love of the Son in return—that bond of love—is something always new in the dynamism of God: the Holy Spirit.

The Son, the Word with which the Father reveals himself, is the Son spoken by the Father in his incarnation.  The Word became flesh, and dwelt among us.  The invisible God made visible.  In his human form we can see the complete selflessness of this love, because we also know our selfishness.  He empties himself of his glory given to him on the throne of heaven:  “power and riches, wisdom and strength, honor and glory and blessing.  To the one who sits on the throne and to the Lamb be blessing and honor, glory and might, forever and ever” (Rev. 5:12-13).

St. Paul says he emptied himself and took the form of a slave.  A limited humanity, poverty. But his relative human powerlessness was an active choice he made, because God has a plan.

The image of the Lamb is key: lambs were sacrificed.  John the Baptist pointed him out when he came: “Behold the Lamb of God!”  Jesus himself becomes the lamb at the Passover celebration, very carefully, legally prescribed by God himself in the Torah.  There was no lamb sacrificed at the center of the Passover meal of the Last Supper.  Jesus says, this is my Body which will be given up for you; this is my blood of the new and eternal covenant which will be poured out for you for the forgiveness of sins.  Literally, now and without beginning or end, “Do this in memory of me.”

He gave us his Word, and his Mother, and his blood and water on the Cross.  Calvary is the culmination of God as he reveals himself from the beginning.  In the depths of the Mystery of the Trinity, despite the bond of Love, the obedient Father-emptying Son is sent forth to reveal and empty himself to us, and for us.  The Word is silent.  In his humanity he knows the darkness of utter forsakenness where exists that everlasting relationship of Love with his Father.  “My God, why have you forsaken me?”  We are born when, after his victory, he empties out his Holy Spirit upon those who are to carry forward his work of revelation and reconciliation.

The sacrifice which restores our love is complete.

As I write this letter to you, there is expected a kind of suffering and feeling of forsakenness which we probably have never known.  Already today (Wednesday) the numbers of the deceased due to this pandemic are rising quickly.  I would ask that you find your confidence in Jesus’ own confidence, that wherever we might go, Jesus has been there before and is still there waiting for us.  He has gone before us in death, certainly, but he is also there in every moment of our life, in our joys and sorrows.  Call upon him, hold onto him.

As we relive the saving passion, death and resurrection of Jesus this Holy Week, consider seeing it from the perspective of his throne in heaven before time began, and is still, when time has ceased.  He is Lord.

God bless you,

Masses and Weekly Announcements ~ Week of 29 March 2020

Community Mass for Friday of the Fifth Week of Lent

Community Mass for Thursday of the Fifth Week of Lent

Community Mass for Wednesday of the Fifth Week of Lent


Community Mass for Tuesday of the Fifth Week of Lent 

Community Mass for Monday of the Fifth Week of Lent


NO FACEBOOK ACCOUNT NEEDED TO VIEW DAILY AND SUNDAY MASSES, Just click on "Not Now"

 

fleur cross logo Times are uncertain but we rely on your offering to the weekly collection to continue parish ministries.  We humbly ask your continued financial support. We humbly ask your continued financial support.


fleur cross logo With the closure of Fairfax County Government Offices last Friday afternoon, our parish office is not physically open, but Kendra and Ivonne are standing by to await your call with calls forwarded to them at home.  Fr. Don is still in the office and between the three of them we can probably respond to your needs or connect you with the rest of our parish staff who are still working from home.  We are still here for you.


fleur cross logo Lenten LIVING STONES are back.  You are welcome to place a stone from the container to in front of the altar, symbolic of those you have already asked to return to the church, so that our whole community might be reminded to pray for them.  If supply is low, please be patient; we will bring more the next week.


fleur cross logo The Bishop’s Lenten Appeal is underway  and we are asking every household in our parish to support this appeal to the extent you are able.   BLA funds are restricted gifts that provide many programs, services and ministries that serve people in need, and may not be used for any other purpose. 


fleur cross logo Mass Intentions are still available and beginning next week we have Masses scheduled without intentions.  We have a form, which may be found on the Announcements page of the website, for you to make requests for Mass intentions.  Or, just call the office.  We are still answering the phone!

Fr. Don's Weekly Letter ~ 29 March 2020

Dear Good People of Saint Bernadette,


First, know that you all are in our prayers, daily Mass and everything we are offering up for each other during this Lenten season.  Somebody said to me a couple of weeks ago, "Don't worry about looking for Lent; Lent will find you."  Prophetic words, perhaps.  I have a feeling we are in for an extended Lent season this year.  But the resurrection will be amazing.


Hopefully by now you have heard about what we can still offer to help bring hope and consolation. Daily Mass, a recorded Stations of the Cross, a Taizé Prayer Service.  It is undeniable that God provides what we need and presents the possibility when the moment is right.  While all of this was unfolding last week and I had no idea how to move forward, suddenly God provided a solution.  Two of our alumni of Saint Bernadette School, Andy Carluccio and Jonathan Kokotajlo, offered to help.  They have turned our chapel into a holy recording studio with several cameras and the expertise to take the footage and edit it, producing a quality video.  I never considered all the different nuances of sound and light in video work.  We thank them not only for their generosity in giving so that the parish might still have our Mass, but also in their willingness to come to the parish when it is probably advisable to stay home.  They are preparing a way for us to continue recording Masses even when they many not be able to be here.


Bishop Burbidge prefers Masses to be recorded and released on the same day, which means that we will be able to provide a daily Mass online beginning at 8:30am on weekdays and Saturdays.  We will celebrate Sunday Mass for the parish online on Saturday afternoon and it will be available by 7:30pm.  Liturgies for the Sacred Triduum will be live-streamed (see page 6) and NOT recorded, so please tune in when it may be found on our parish Facebook page.


Confessions will continue outside. Also, David Mathers our music director will continue to produce weekly liturgy sheets which we will post online so you have a resource to follow along with at Mass, including readings and music.  Since the Government Center shutdown last Friday, we will determine hours be creative and see what we might do.


Remember ECHO.  People will be needing food now more than ever and ECHO is our most active feeding service in the parish.  Rather than dropping food off at the church as we have done with our Can-A-Week program, please take it directly to ECHO and they will pick it up from you at the curb.  Contact ECHO to learn their greatest needs and hours of operation at www.ECHO-inc.org.

~  ~  +  ~  ~

We know good can always come out of the darkest times.  Jesus is the light that dispels all darkness.  Now more than ever you must stay close to him in spiritual Communion.  One of the songs we sing in the Taize prayer service online says, "Dare to forgive and God will be with you.  God is forgiveness.  Love and do not fear."  Fear is the absence of love, and can happen when we have isolated ourselves and find ourselves feeling alone.  Be confident that the love of God floods your being, and our love being together multiplies that love and casts out fear.  But we must rely on one another, and together pray to God.  

I have already been hearing stories of how peoples' lives have changed in just one week—for the better.  Some people have said that they realize now that all the hectic things they had put in their lives may not have been so important after all.  They can see that family time is more important.  We needed to simplify.  Even our faith and God had been often pushed out of the calendar because we make ourselves busy.  When I have been out, I have seen families taking walks together, getting to know each other again. 


This will also reveal to us that so many things, so much stuff in our lives, really isn't necessary.  It is my deep desire that we will rediscover how great our faith practice is and how we may have been taking it for granted.  Sometimes we realize how much we desire something when we are deprived of it.


In the season of Lent, this is one of the reasons we practice fasting.  Fasting has long been a practice to ask God for the forgiveness of our sins as well as, as a people, to call upon God for deliverance.  I ask you to please consider choosing a day to fast.  I will be fasting on Fridays and perhaps we can be spiritually united in this ancient practice.  Also there are many rosaries and other devotions live streaming on Zoom and other social media platforms—join in.  I am very grateful that we have the internet as a way to continue coming together.  For the past week our community in the school and parish gatherings has taken on the appearance of Hollywood Squares or the Brady Bunch.  I have never been a fan of video conferences taking the place of face-to-face encounters, but when that is not possible, it is so, so great to see you online, for now.  I pray you stay cautious, healthy, and hopeful.


God bless you.

Announcements ~ 22 March 2020

We have received a few messages from people about how they can continue to support the parish during this difficult time. 

As many families go from paycheck to paycheck, that is pretty much the case for the parish as well, and we rely on your support.  Most of our staff are able to fulfill most of their duties by working remotely from home – as do our teachers and students – but their salaries rely on your weekly offertory and tuition payments. We are working to reduce utility and other expenses, manage our contractual obligations but we do need your help keeping our staff paid and the facilities running. We received several envelopes this past Sunday totaling $80.  We ask for your kind support. 

Please, if you are able, place envelopes through the mail slot at the front door of the parish office located at the top of the church steps and to the right or you are welcome to mail in your contribution.

All who have an email address and are not already enrolled in Faith Direct will receive an invitation for electronic giving from Faith Direct. You can enroll at any time using our church code VA70.

Please stay safe, and may we hold each other close in prayer.

 

 

fleur cross logo.Lenten LIVING STONES are back.  You are welcome to place a stone from the container to in front of the altar, symbolic of those you have already asked to return to the church, so that our whole community might be reminded to pray for them.  If supply is low, please be patient; we will bring more the next week.


fleur cross logo Instead of our monthly TAIZE prayer service on Monday, March 23 at 8pm in the church, you are invited to join us in prayer at our parish facebook page. Invite all your Christian friends to join us in this beautiful, peaceful ecumenical prayer service in the tradition of the Taizé Community in France.


fleur cross logo The office is still open for business as usual with limited on-site parish staff and shorter hours, 8:30am to 4:30pm.  We have had a challenge with our phone recording equipment (bad timing) but you can find our news online.  Don't forget, we are here for you.

fleur cross logo The Bishop’s Lenten Appeal is underway  and we are asking every household in our parish to support this appeal to the extent you are able.   BLA funds are restricted gifts that provide many programs, services and ministries that serve people in need, and may not be used for any other purpose. 


fleur cross logo Saint Bernadette Parish and School follows the Fairfax County School System regarding closing policy. At this time the school is closed for the foreseeable future and day and evening meetings and gatherings are either canceled or postponed.  Keep up to date on our website for developments.

Fr. Don's Weekly Letter ~ 22 March 2020

Dear Good People of Saint Bernadette,

The icon on the cover this week is called "Salus Populi Romani," literally Health or Salvation of the Roman People, an icon from the Byzantine period found by Saint Helena in Jerusalem in the 4th century. According to the oral tradition, it is one of the images painted of Mary by Saint Luke. I don't need to give all the details here, but this icon has always held a very privileged place in the life of Church.

Pope Francis went to pray at the patriarchial basilica Santa Maria Maggiore before this image asking the healing intercession of the Blessed Virgin Mary last Sunday. " With his prayer, the Holy Father pleaded for an end to the pandemic that has struck Italy and the world. He also implored the healing of the many sick people, remembered the numerous victims of these past days, and asked that their families and friends might find consolation and comfort. His prayer intention was also extended to healthcare workers, doctors, nurses, and all those working in these days to guarantee the smooth functioning of society. The Holy Father returned to the Vatican around 5:30pm (Zenit).”

In 593 Pope St. Gregory the Great carried the icon in procession to stop a plague. In 1837 Pope Gregory XVI invoked her to put an end to a cholera epidemic.

Now is a time to pray, and to be care-ful. Take care of each other with a special patience and respect, and take care of yourselves, too, because we may be called upon to serve in a way we haven't known before. We have a lot of time with disrupted routines: make prayer a cornerstone of your new daily life. Join our community together at Mass online each day. With the help of generous St. B school alumni Andy Carluccio and Jonathan Kokotajlo, we have the ability to video Mass which we post on our parish facebook page (facebook.com/stbernpar) and also link to our parish website (click the "Announcements" button on the front page - www.stbernpar.org - and then find the link for the video on the next). You can find the latest of Bishop Burbidge's messages at the diocesan website, www.arlingtondiocese.org. We assure you of our prayers in this difficult time, and rely on yours, too. It seems like things were changing every 15 minutes there for a few days, and we have tried to keep as up-to-the-moment with you as possible.

Otherwise, all we can do is wait and see how long we will have this temporary way of life. Hopefully we will learn things to take forward with us after it is over. Up until now I have resisted video conferences. I have several everydays now and am grateful for this better way of staying connected. We have to keep our community together, and not isolate. We have to keep in contact with God more than ever, and know that together we are Body of Christ. There is strength in this: as I said last weekend in a reflection on our baptism, you have put on Christ. This is an armor, a new skin so that these worldly threats cannot penetrate your soul. So stay close to him.

The church is open for visits, but we still have to observe the 10 person limit at one time. Please honor this requirement.

God bless you.

Diocesan and Parish Updates for COVID 19

Bishop Burbidge has announced that all public Masses are canceled indefinitely.  All other gatherings have been canceled or postponed as well, as groups must be limited to 10 persons or less and we follow the Fairfax County Public Schools policy of closing our facilities.  We are still trying to figure out how to hold funerals, confessions, and other activities only allowing 10 people to be present.  Bishop asks that we try to understand the spirit that is behind the restrictions, to keep others safe as well as ourselves.  

A message from Fr. Don regarding the COVID-19

Dear Good People of Saint Bernadette,

We continue to pray for the health of everyone and the containment and resolution of this current health crisis.

Please know that we have been carefully watching developments and waited until after Fairfax County’s press conference took place this afternoon to see if there would be any changes in the way we are thinking of going forward.

Unless we receive word from Bishop Burbidge or local government that assemblies such as Mass are not allowed, we plan to continue as much as normal.  Emphasis must be placed that anyone, whether at risk because of age or health condition that would cause risk, is not expected to attend.  Bishop Burbidge gave a dispensation for the obligation to attend Mass to anyone who is 60 or over, has chronic illness or immune system deficiencies, as well as those who care for such persons.  Anyone who shows common symptoms of illness should avoid coming to Mass and parish activities until 24 hours after symptoms abate.  People who have doubts about whether or not they should self-quarantine should probably not be in close proximity with others.  Read the full statement from Bishop at www.arlingtondiocese.org.

I will work in the next couple of days to put together a parish Mass all can sign into via Zoom so those who need to stay home can still experience a connection with the Mass and community.  I’ll know more about this tomorrow.

If further closures are announced by Fairfax County Public Schools, we will follow their policies, as we always have.  That would mean that evening programs on the campus are canceled.  Catholic Charities has already canceled their programs in the diocese.

Prayer is always a good pastime. It looks like we may have some time on our hands in the coming days.  Prayer is powerful and this is a good time to ask for help.  It also is calming and will help in the long run since fear and anxiety can also compromise immune systems.

Stay well.  I will be back in touch soon. 

Fr. Don

Announcements ~ 15 March 2020

fleur cross logo Lenten LIVING STONES are back.  You are welcome to place a stone from the container to in front of the altar, symbolic of those you have already asked to return to the church, so that our whole community might be reminded to pray for them.  If supply is low, please be patient; we will bring more the next week.
 
fleur cross logo Please join us tomorrow, Monday, March 23 at 8pm for this month’s TAIZE Prayer Service. Invite all your Christian friends to join us in this beautiful, peaceful ecumenical prayer service in the tradition of the Taizé Community in France.
 
fleur cross logo Our Parish Penance Service will be Tuesday, March 31 at 6:30pm, a time that we will have at least sixteen priests (English and Spanish) who will be here for you. Please plan to come.  + Martes, 31 de marzo.  Unanse a nosotros para un servicio especial que incluye confesión individual rápida y absolución.  Favor mirar el boletín.
 
fleur cross logo The Bishop’s Lenten Appeal is underway  and we are asking every household in our parish to support this appeal to the extent you are able.   BLA funds are restricted gifts that provide many programs, services and ministries that serve people in need, and may not be used for any other purpose.
 
fleur cross logo Inclement weather policy: Saint Bernadette Parish and School follows the Fairfax County School System regarding closings for snow and other inclement weather. An announcement will be made even on Saturdays and Sundays because the school buildings are used for extracurricular and community activities on the weekends.

Fr. Don's Weekly Letter ~ 15 March 2020

Dear Good People of Saint Bernadette,

As I work on this article today, we are still in the middle of Forty Hours, our parish retreat and mission for Lent.  I remember when we were kids we would go to church at night sometimes during the week and the parish would have adoration of the Blessed Sacrament.  I always remember it as a kind of time that was different from other time.  It is time that stands, somehow, between the experience of God Visible and Invisible.  So far we are having a great Forty Hours this year.  I am grateful for the generosity of those who are coming to our evening talks and Masses, and all who have taken some extra time to simply come and be in the presence of God.  It has been a great time for peace and quiet.

If Jesus were sitting in a chair in your living room, you all probably would be paying attention, at least I would hope that all would recognize something incredible was happening.  But even seeing him as a man (with the only exception being what we saw last Sunday in his Transfiguration on Mount Tabor), there is still this suspense of imagination between seeing Jesus, an outwardly similar person as you or I, and the glory that lies within.  I like to think of that suspense of imagination as the doorway to faith.  It requires a humility and a willingness to allow, to receive, that which is not necessarily fully known to come to us and help us know more.  Our world, in many ways, has stopped listening and forgotten that to have faith, you have to have faith.

We enter today into a special, vital three-week cycle of the Word of God at Sunday Masses.  Pay attention!  The Third, Fourth and Fifth Sundays of Lent in Cycle A (as well as every year for the Masses where the assembly prays over those to receive the Easter Sacraments—this year, 11am Mass on the 15th, 9am Mass on the 22nd, and 11am Mass on the 29th) include the definitive texts of Jesus’ self-revelation, not only in his words but his actions as well.  These are the texts from the Gospels in which Jesus clearly reveals himself as the fulfillment of the Father’s plan, a plan which up to this point was a process of preparing humanity for conciliation with God in Jesus’ Person.

“Stooping down” (an image often used by Church Fathers in the first centuries to describe the Incarnation of the Son of God) to speak with a Samaritan and sinful woman, Jesus reveals God’s intention to go out to the peripheries and call back those who still thirst for God but may not even know it.  The water, as always, finds central place in God’s story of faithfulness and grace.  Jesus says to her, “I AM the living water,” life-giving water in the context of our desert lives.

Next weekend is an almost comical story of how confusion and blindness has caused everyone’s failure to understand even blindness itself.  Everyone is obsessed with whodunnit and who to blame for it that they have completely obscured the truth that Jesus has brought the light of life to not only the blind man who can now see, but has brought the opportunity of keen sight to all the rest who have chosen blindness instead.  Jesus says to him I AM: “You have seen him, the one speaking with you is he.”

In two weeks on the Fifth Sunday of Lent we listen, astounded.  When the Gospel is proclaimed in two weeks, put down the missalette and just listen (this should be the case all the time...).  Imagine that you are hearing this story for the first time, and grant yourself a child-like innocence that what you are hearing is the “Gospel-Truth.”  Not only because it really happened, of course, but also because it is so shockingly unbelievable.  It seems that Jesus waits for his friend’s death to happen so that he could be the one to restore his life, knowing that there were those nearby who were close to killing him.  He calls forth Lazarus from the tomb.  To Martha he says, “I AM the resurrection and the life. Whoever believes in me, even if he dies, will live.”  She replies with her “I believe.”

The all-caps of “I AM” is emphasis which I have placed on the texts included here.  But I don’t think it is a stretch to assume that Jesus, when he said these words, was aware of the words he spoke to Moses two millennia before in the burning bush.  Moses asked the voice in the bush, whom shall I say sent me?  The Voice said, “I AM WHO AM.  Tell them I AM sent me.”  The flame which naturally would be destructive as well as giving light and warmth, did no harm to the bush, but enlightened the mind of Moses and warmed his heart to do the will of I AM.  The visible revealed a much deeper invisible reality.  Moses led the people of God through the water of death to a first covenant with God.

God’s terrible and unfathomable Being is somehow contained in frail humanity without doing it any harm:  we spoke of this at the Annunciation of Mary and the Nativity of the Lord last year.  We have come far as God’s people by his grace.  He now calls us through the water of life, baptism, to a New Covenant, his Blood which will be poured out for the forgiveness of sin.  “Do this,” he says, “in memory of me.”

God bless you.